Lessons from 300k+ Lines of Infrastructure Code

From QCon London
March 30 2019.

"Yevgeniy Brikman shares key lessons from the “Infrastructure Cookbook” they developed at Gruntwork while creating and maintaining a library of over 300,000 lines of infrastructure code used in production by hundreds of companies. Topics include how to design infrastructure APIs, automated tests for infrastructure code, patterns for reuse and composition, refactoring, namespacing, and more."

Mikes Notes


  • Brikman gives a sobering presentation about the reality of DevOps rather than the hype.
  • The good, the bad and the ugly.


"Brikman: Thank you all for coming. This is a talk, as Jonas mentioned, of the ugly layer beneath your microservices, all the infrastructure under the hood that it's going to take to make them work and some of the lessons we learned. There's not a great term for this. I'm just going to use the word DevOps, although it's not super well-defined. And one of the things I want to share is a confession about DevOps to start the talk off.

Hey, there it is. There's a limited range on this thing. So here's the confession - the DevOps industry is very much in the stone ages, and I don't say that to be mean or to insult anybody. I just mean, literally, we are still new to this. We have only been doing DevOps, at least as a term, for a few years. Still figuring out how to do it. But what's scary about that is we're being asked to build things that are very modern. We're being asked to put together these amazing, cutting edge infrastructures, but I feel like the tooling we're using to do it looks something like that.

Now, you wouldn't know that if all you did was read blog posts, read the headlines, everything sounds really cutting edge. Half the talks here, half the blog posts out there, they're going to be about, oh my God, Kurbernetes, and Docker, and microservices, and service meshes, and all these unbelievable things that sound really cutting edge. But for me as a developer, on a day to day basis, it doesn't feel quite so cutting edge, right? That's not what my day-to-day experience feels like. My day-to-day experience with DevOps feels a little more like that. You're cooking pizza on an iron with a blow dryer. This is your hashtag for this talk, #thisisdevops. This is what it feels like.

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